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Michigan Transportation History

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Michigan Central Railroad Station, Ypsilanti.
(Ypsilanti Historical Society Photo)

This is a research site on Michigan's transportation history that has evolved from my specialty research conducted on Michigan transportation improvements (especially its railroads) and business history. Much of the information researched here grew from articles I had started or developed at either Wikipedia or Citizendium. This site was started in 2006 at a height of interest (both socially and personally) in wiki-based research and writing.

Internal improvement of the lines of communication through the Great Lakes region brought about significant and fast-paced change. As one who witnessed these changes in his lifetime, Austin Blair remarked, "It is but a little while, since we were strangers to those who lived fifty miles south of us, and we hail with delight the opportunity the railroads have afforded of taking counsel together."1 These changes in transportation caused changes in state politics and business practices. Thus it is difficult to study transportation history in isolation from the men and women who, through their social interactions, wove the network of political and financial power just as they wove the lines of communication. For this reason, Michigan Transportation History presents discrete articles on people and their business enterprises hoping to illuminate the business and social relationships between them. Other articles dealing with Great Lakes history are here as well.

Current content includes:

People

Transportation Topics

Michigan's Business History (mostly railroads)

History of Great Lakes & Michigan

Also here are research topics related to the history of the Great Lakes and of Michigan generally and not specifically to industrial or transportation history.

Notes

1 Laura Ream, History of a Trip to the Great Saginaw Valley, June, 1871 (Indianapolis: R. J. Bright & Co., 1871), 33.


Russel Wheel & Foundry Co., advertisement, Hardwood Recorder, October 25, 1906, p. 44.

Page last modified on January 16, 2019, at 05:03 PM EST